Erbalab : Création de la Phyto de demain

L'utilisation des plantes remonte pratiquement au commencement de l'humanité !

Plants as foods

Plants as foods

BC
First known text

First known text

On herbal medicine, written on a clay tablet in cuneiform characters by the Sumerians in Mesopotamia. The Mesopotamians used plants such as the myrtle, hemp, thyme, and willow in filtered decoctions.

3000 years BC
Ebers Papyrus

Ebers Papyrus

The first known Pharaonic collection devoted to medicinal plants. By far the most voluminous in Ancient Egypt, with "110 pages". It referred to even older documents citing dozens of plants accompanied by a mode of use.

1600 years BC
Hippocrates

Hippocrates

The great Greek physician registered the benefits of some 250 plants in his Corpus Hippocratum. We attribute this famous phrase to him: "Let food be your medicine".

400 years BC
Etymology

Etymology

The "phytotherapy" word comes from two Greek words (phyton, plant and therapein, heal), which essentially means "treat with plants". The Greeks ate mushrooms in particular to improve their athletic performance.

300 years BC
Plants at the service of society

Plants at the service of society

AD
Dioscorides

Dioscorides

The Greek physician wrote his famous work Materia Medica on the subject of medicine; this identified more than 600 plants. It will remain a reference work for centuries.

100 years AD
Claude Galien

Claude Galien

The Roman doctor registered approximately 400 medicinal plants, specifying for each of them the therapeutic effects, the indications and possible contraindications. We owe the term "galenic pharmacy" to him, a discipline that deals with the methods of preparation and the forms in which drugs are administered. The therapists of the time were predominantly sorcerers and priests, and the elimination of the disease was carried by practices and herbs said to be "magic", the latter harvested and prepared according to many very complex rites and most often burned.

200 years AD
Capitulaire De Villis

Capitulaire De Villis

The Early Middle Ages are marked by the decree of Charlemagne of Villis, with the Capitulary of Villis, aiming to extend the culture of medicinal plants. This text listed a total of 94 plants that the royal domains needed to cultivate, and gave useful indications on the fruits and vegetables grown at the time in France. During the Middle Ages, during epidemics of the plague, it was realized that some aromatic substances could prevent the spread of the infection. People drank potions (most often herbal teas) to cure many ills.

800 years AD
St. Hildegard of Bingen

St. Hildegard of Bingen

This Benedictine abbess of the 12th century (1098-1179) was the mother of the modern herbal medicine. She gave valuable advice on the use of plants to cure society ills: "For the healthy ones who become suddenly ill, we must use the herbs that grow in the east; for the melancholy ones and those suffering from the chest, you need to help with herbs that grow on the west; to those suffering from paralysis and high daily fevers, triples or quads, you need to help them with herbs that are born in the south; as for the frantic ones and those suffering from liver, we must treat them with herbs that are born in the north "(causes and remedies 266).

1000 years AD
The appearance of botany as a science

The appearance of botany as a science

The Renaissance
The scientific spirit

The scientific spirit

As the result of empiricism and observation, the modern scientific spiritaw and tried to explain the reasons of the therapeutic effects of plants: they began to be analyzed, categorized, listed in Pharmacopoeia.

Renaissance (1300-1700)
The discoveries

The discoveries

The discovery of the New Worlds (Asia and the Americas) was accompanied by the discovery of a multitude of other plants, as well as the practices of the indigenous populations. Christopher Columbus and Vasco da Gama brought home "plants of the discovery" from their expeditions.

1500
Theory of Signatures

Theory of Signatures

Paracelsus, alchemist, defined the concept of the active principle (the component of a drug that has a therapeutic effect). He then developed the theory of signatures: the shape and colour of plants, animals, hands, etc., indicate their affinities and correspondence with other things, such as the organs. For example, "the root of Satyrion is formed like the genital organs of man" (Greek: Orchis = testis). "Accordingly it promises to restore a man's potency and sexual desire as if by magic."

1600
Herbalist diploma

Herbalist diploma

Creation of the Herbalist diploma by the Faculty of Medicine of Paris.

1778 
Plants of secondary importance

Plants of secondary importance

Beginning of the 20th C
Plants at the service of military defence

Plants at the service of military defence

Some unknown plants in Europe were discovered by the military. This is the case of the Harpagophytum procumbens. Europeans discovered its properties during the war which took place in 1902 in South Africa. It is because of the positive effects obtained on the speed of recovery of the soldiers recruited from the natives who made the doctors of the British Army look into the benefits of this specific plant.

1902
Discovery of new medicines

Discovery of new medicines

In the developed countries, with the advent of modern chemistry and the "miraculous" discovery of new drugs (such as antibiotics, notably penicillin in 1928), herbal medicine had to take a back seat, being viewed as "grandmother's remedy" with uncertain benefits. The techniques of this period (grinding) remained quite rudimentary and did not lead to high stability or bioavailability of the fragile active ingredients (vitamins, enzymes, volatile substances) due to the heat produced by the crushing of the plant.

1928
Pharmacists order

Pharmacists order

Abolition of the herbalist diploma under the Pétain regime, in favour of the creation of an order of pharmacists who were granted a monopoly on recommending and selling plants. The sidelining of herbal medicine was just for a limited period: the adverse side effects of some synthetic drugs were soon revealed and people began to take a new interest in plants.

1941
A new breath of fresh air for herbal medicine!

A new breath of fresh air for herbal medicine!

Since the 80ies
New techniques

New techniques

New techniques, such as cryogenic grinding (powder of the plant derived from cooling the dried plant with liquid nitrogen before grinding), the SIPFs and EPSs (full suspension of the fresh plants and standardized plant extracts: plants received, inspected and then frozen before grinding) were developed and enable an improvement in the quality of the products marketed.

The 1980ies
The recognition

The recognition

Phytotherapy is recognised in France as a fully-fledged branch of medicine. The Department of Health is proposing an AMM regulation (marketing authorisation) for specialised pharmaceutical products based on plants.

1986
Birth of the Modern Phytotherapy

Birth of the Modern Phytotherapy

Beginning of 21st C
Birth of the commercial use of plants!

Birth of the commercial use of plants!

Emergence of a new herbal medicine that reconciles the centuries-old traditions, the proof of scientific effectiveness, a high level of technology guaranteeing the quality and safety of the products and finally respect for the plant. This century also demonstrates the willingness of consumers to adapt galenic products to their new ways of life. However the market has demonstrated very few innovations in the field for decades: the capsules, bi-pointed ampoules and tablets still exist due to the lack of better alternatives...

Beginning of the 21st century
ERBALAB

ERBALAB

Creation of ERBALAB breaking with the traditional codes of phytotherapy and the administration mode of plant-based food supplements!

2015
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